Tag Archives: books

The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry, by Rachel Joyce

Life is a complicated business. We make odd choices, say things we regret, hurt the people close to us, and stray from the path we’d imagined for ourselves. It happens to everyone, to a greater or lesser extent. It happened … Continue reading

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Breakfast at Tiffany’s

I imagine that a great many people have seen Breakfast at Tiffany’s at some point, and enjoyed it as an iconic Audrey Hepburn movie, but have never read the book.  To misquote Roald Dahl (from his retelling of Cinderella): I … Continue reading

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Book Review: Charles Dickens’ A Tale of Two Cities

A Tale of Two Cities provides a window into the terror and madness of the French Revolution. It immerses the reader in the abject poverty, hopelessness and powerlessness of the French working classes. Men and women scrabble in the mud … Continue reading

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Book Review: Ann Patchett’s ‘Bel Canto’

Bel Canto is devastating and beautiful. It is exquisitely written, sucking you into the story from the very first page. It is a tale of hopelessness, humanity, empathy, and love. In a desperately poor and brutalized country, where citizens are … Continue reading

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Book Review: Michael Chabon’s ‘The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay’

The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay is the epic tale of fifteen years in the lives of Joe and Sam, boy geniuses and would-be heroes. Their story is interlaced with quirky period detail. References to music, people, sporting events … Continue reading

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Book Review: R.D. Blackmoore’s Lorna Doone

Lorna Doone was written 140 years ago, and is set 340 years in the past. Its pace and style is very different to that of a modern novel. It is gentle and slow, and even a little ponderous in places. … Continue reading

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Book Review: Rian Malan’s ‘My Traitor’s Heart’

My Traitor’s Heart lays bare the anxiety and fear created by ‘otherness.’ Malan wrestles with the primitive instinct that categorises people into ‘us’ and ‘them.’ He finds himself, defined by his race, ethnicity and name, on the wrong side in … Continue reading

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